Archive for June, 2011

OpenProcessing.org

After writing a couple of sketches in processing, the urge to share it tends to become bigger. Of course processing lets you export a sketch as an application for any architecture$(windows, linux, OS/X). That has the advantage of eventually using more of the power of the local hardware, but not everybody wants to download the full program just to have a sneak-peek preview how it looks like in action. Processing also let’s you generate an applet that can be included in web-pages. In case you are not maintaining your own web-server, OpenProcessing comes in very handy in a couple of aspects.
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DREAM – RECOMB

The 6th Annual DREAM on Reverse Engineering Challenges, the 7th Annual RECOMB Satellite on Systems Biology, and the 8th Annual RECOMB Satellite on Regulatory Genomics will be held jointly at the IDIBELL institute (Barcelona) on October 14-19, 2011. The meeting will start at 9am on Friday October 14, 2011, and run till 6pm on Wednesday October 19, 2011 (October 14: DREAM; October 16-17: Systems Biology; October 18-19: Regulatory Genomics).
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Everything and Nothing


The pictures of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation have been fascinating me since looking deeper into the relative spatial distribution of residue contacts in proteins and complexes.  Now here is a beautifully produced documentary by the BBC that takes you to the edge of the universe and everyting else we know about – well – mostly nothing :
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Structural Complexomics @ labtube.tv beta

Labtube.tv providing videos for the scientific community receives an overhaul. Plans are to go life at end of this month, the beta release is already available here. My recommendation: “Towards Eukaryotic Structural Complexomics” by Imre Berger.

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Free Radicals: The Secret Anarchy of Science

13 things that don't make sense

Via the Cambridge University Alumni Group I was made aware of the forthcoming event “Free Radicals: The Secret Anarchy of Science” at the Real Time Club Dinner on the 21st of June from 18:00 to 21:00 at the National Liberal Club, Whitehall Place, SW1A 2HE. You do not need to be a member of the club to attend this event: see http://bit.ly/iE5Hc8.

The speaker is Michael Brooks – an English scientist and author. It promises to be quite an interesting event, especially since Brooks takes a strong stance against political representatives of pseudo-science – more from him about himself can be found at http://www.michaelbrooks.org/.

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Blueprint for the Brain

Science Bytes is a series of short videos, based on recently published studies from the Public Library of Science (PLoS), which highlight discoveries that are shaping our future.

The opening line is “THIS IS YOUR BRAIN … AND THIS IS A MACHINE THAT ACTS LIKE IT HAS ONE.” 😉

Episode 1: Blueprint for the Brain from Science Bytes on Vimeo.

Meet two scientists who have begun to unlock the secrets of the brain’s architecture.

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The future of scientific publishing?

It’s nice to see that at least some publishers recognize that the old rites in desseminating scientific knowledge are just not appropriate and up-to-date anymore.
So here is Elseviers approach: at articleofthefuture.com they published a couple of prototypes in different disciplines, the one that caught my attention is this one in the Mathematics and ComputerScience Section on “Supervised ranking in the weka environment” (also check out this previous post on machine learning).

It is an improvement, definitely. If this format is the future of articles remains to be seen, I am looking forward to some life-science related articles to appear. Any feedback on their webpage might lead to further improvements, seems they are actually ready to listen to user requests – whether this is motivated by a stroke of insight or by the pressure mounting from the increasing popularity of OpenAccess journals like PLoS – who knows?

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