Nobel Prize in Computing


Pearl‘s book on “Causality” has been on my shelf for a while now. I also read it, a few times, but never managed to get through it in one go, cover to cover. Consequently, I haven’t come to grips with all details, implications and equations yet. No reason to worry about my intellectual capabilities, it’s quite fundamental and takes time to sink in. Now Judea Pearl has been awarded the 2011 ACM Turing Award – Congratulations!

The annual Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing Award, sometimes called the “Nobel Prize in Computing,” recognizes Pearl for his advances in probabilistic and causal reasoning. His work has enabled creation of thinking machines that can cope with uncertainty, making decisions even when answers aren’t black or white. […]
The UCLA computer science professor is widely credited with coining the term “Bayesian Network,” which refers to a statistical model ACM describes as mimicking “the neural activities of the human brain, constantly exchanging messages without benefit of a supervisor.” Bayesian networks have been used to, among other things, analyze biological data for studies of medicine and diseases.

Here is a chance to see him talk for yourself:

“I compute, therefore I understand” – More videos are here on theScienceNetwork.

found via networkworld.com: Judea Pearl, a big brain behind artificial intelligence, wins Turing Award. See also on the ACM NEWS “Judea Pearl Wins 2011 ACM Turing Award“.

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  1. #1 by cistronic on 2012/04/19 - 19:36

    “Judea Pearl Wins ACM Turing Award for Contributions that Transformed Artificial Intelligence”
    http://www.bayesia.com/en/news/bayesialab/Pearl-TuringAward.php
    Haven’t tested it yet, there is a 30 day free “BayesiaLab” trial version available on their site:
    http://www.bayesia.com/en/products/bayesialab/download.php

  2. #2 by cistronic on 2012/04/25 - 09:12

    nature has a special on Turings 100th birthday : ALAN TURING AT 100
    “Alan Turing, born a century ago this year, is best known for his wartime code-breaking and for inventing the ‘Turing machine’ – the concept at the heart of every computer today. But his legacy extends much further: he founded the field of artificial intelligence, proposed a theory of biological pattern formation and speculated about the limits of computation in physics. In this collection of features and opinion pieces, Nature celebrates the mind that, in a handful of papers over a tragically short lifetime, shaped many of the hottest fields in science today.”

    http://www.nature.com/news/specials/turing/index.html

    found via Florian’s “SCIENTIFIC B-SIDES”
    http://scientificbsides.wordpress.com/2012/04/20/an-apple-laced-with-cyanice-alan-turing-still-controversial-at-100/

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