Posts Tagged Science

Weekend Science Videos: Views from and into the (night) sky above us

A message from space to our blue marble:

And here is the executive summary: “Our Story in 1 Minute” (somewhat reminiscent of the BigBangTheory Intro Sequence) by melodysheep

The following footage taken from the International Space Station left me speechless anyway: “View from the ISS at Night” by  (fullscreen view is a must)

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The great ideas of biology

The guardian has a series called “It’s a small world“, among which is a video called “Gregor Mendel and the genesis of genetics” where

Nobel laureate Sir Paul Nurse tells the story of another great idea in biology – genes as the basis of heredity – in a lecture at the Royal Institution in London. It all started with the gardening monk Gregor Mendel and his peas in the 19th century and reached a key milestone with the unravelling of the molecule of heredity, the DNA double helix, by James Watson and Francis Crick in 1953

The great ideas of biology covered are

  • the cell
  • the gene
  • natural selection
  • Life as chemistry
  • Biology as an organized system.

Similarly to “A Brief Introduction to GeneticsDavid Murawsky (as mentioned around here before, but hey, they repeat stuff on TV all the time, and not only the goodies) put another impressive clip out there: “18 Things You Should Know About Genetics“. Enjoy!

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Happy birthday Richard !

Not that he won’t mind it was already yesterday. Since there are a couple of posts related to him on this site there is probably no need re-iterate how inspirational he was and even over 2 decades after his death still is. Just a welcome occasion to point out richard-feynman.net which has a great collection of videos, a photo gallery and quotes like this one on the ignorance of experts:

Science alone of all the subjects contains within itself the lesson of the danger of belief in the infallibility of the greatest teachers in the preceding generation … Learn from science that you must doubt the experts. As a matter of fact, I can also define science another way: Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts…

Let me refer you to this post with a bit more physics in it while leaving you with this scene from the movie “Infinity”, showing Feynman at the tender age of 6 learning a few things about science from his father.

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Engineering Connections in an Invisible World – a Crash Course

For several years I’ve been a big fan of  Top Gear – the guys have been entertaining my inner child. Seen rationally, the petrol-based internal combustion engine is a dead end,  but getting from A to B is hardly the point, or is it? I like the irreverent, playful and fun approach to how things actually work – by taking them apart, blowing them up or whatever else seems suitable – they have an immense imagination in that department. You know, what distinguishes the men from the boys is the size of their toys. In this regard, the top gear presenters are the real grown-ups, thinking big and out of the box. Some of their projects on science and engineering are among my all-time favourites, so I am happy to see Richard “Hamster” Hammond back on the screen again.

First, there’s the recently launched “Crash Course” :  

And then I have to mention his series “Engineering Connections” on the National Geographic Channel where Hammond

looks at how engineers and designers use historic inventions and clues from the natural world in ingenious ways to develop new buildings and machines.

And if you still can take some more, there is some really stunning footage in the “Invisible worlds” –  series (2010). Definitely something to go into my DVD collection, here’s a teaser:

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Nobel Prize in Technology

The 2012 Millennium Technology Prize (Technology Academy Finland) will be awarded to Linus Torvalds and Dr Shinya Yamanaka.

Linus Torvalds initiated LINUX about 20 years ago (as mentioned previously, see here).


Dr. Yamanaka pioneered work on induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells or iPSCs), using a combination of c-MycKlf4Oct-3/4, and Sox2.

As a bioinformatician, I cannot help but point out that ComputerScience and stem-cell research are sharing such a prestigious award. Somewhat a confirmation of the idea that combining the two in a fruitful way is a very good idea, indeed. And in this context I’d like to mention Hans Schöler, whom I had the pleasure to listen to recently. In his excellent work he demonstrated that Oct4 plays a key-role in reprogramming. The structural underpinnings he presented were simply brilliant – see the PDB molecule-of-the-month article on “Oct and Sox Transcription Factors” as a substitute.

(found via heise.de and zdnet.com)

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Play more …


The Federation of American Scientists (FAS) Learning Technologies Program (pre-)launched the Science Game Centerto demonstrate to teachers, scientists, museums, and parents the myriad ways games can be used to improve education in math and science“. Next to Phylo and Fold.it (which I mentioned around here before) are several entries listed I haven’t seen yet. It may be due to the movie “Fantastic Voyage” that made a lasting impression on me as a kid that “Immune attack” immediately caught my attention. After all, I’d rather kick some pathogenic butt than blowing up poor aliens in space. Good hunting!

P.S.: Reminds me of this quote by 137th Gebirg on battlestarforum.com

“I may appear unoccupied to you, but at the molecular level, I’m really quite busy.”

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Free Ivy-League Education

 After I mentioned theScienceNetwork in the previous post and you might already be aware of sites such as SciVee.tv, labtube.tv and iTunes U it’s time to share some recent links in the area of online-courses:

First, with a biological focus, there is iBioSeminars accompanied by iBioMagazine – let me just highlight this talk by David Baltimore.

On the computational side, there is udacity which was started by former Stanford professor and Google fellow Sebastian Thrun. He developed a vision for “University 2.0” under the motto of “democratizing higher education”. After having experienced that he could reach out to more people in a better way by a single online course than he could have by traditional teaching (even in huuuge overcrowded lecture halls) during the next couple of years he just couldn’t go back to the olden ways. He really has a point in dumping his professorship I heartily agree with, and that’s an understatement. I highly recommend to check out his talk at DLD (hosted by the gorgeous Maria Furtwängler), here is a teaser-trailer for the CS101-class “Building a Search Engine”:

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(You might want to check out this previous post on the online courses at Stanford)


To round things up, at the moment there is a free introductory course on Machine Learning “Learning from Data” ongoing at Caltech by Professor Yaser Abu-Mostafa covering basic theory, algorithms, and applications. Registration is still possible, the previous lectures are available here.

Video et studio, ergo sum.

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