Posts Tagged Visualisation

Weekend Science Videos: Views from and into the (night) sky above us

A message from space to our blue marble:

And here is the executive summary: “Our Story in 1 Minute” (somewhat reminiscent of the BigBangTheory Intro Sequence) by melodysheep

The following footage taken from the International Space Station left me speechless anyway: “View from the ISS at Night” by  (fullscreen view is a must)

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Engineering Connections in an Invisible World – a Crash Course

For several years I’ve been a big fan of  Top Gear – the guys have been entertaining my inner child. Seen rationally, the petrol-based internal combustion engine is a dead end,  but getting from A to B is hardly the point, or is it? I like the irreverent, playful and fun approach to how things actually work – by taking them apart, blowing them up or whatever else seems suitable – they have an immense imagination in that department. You know, what distinguishes the men from the boys is the size of their toys. In this regard, the top gear presenters are the real grown-ups, thinking big and out of the box. Some of their projects on science and engineering are among my all-time favourites, so I am happy to see Richard “Hamster” Hammond back on the screen again.

First, there’s the recently launched “Crash Course” :  

And then I have to mention his series “Engineering Connections” on the National Geographic Channel where Hammond

looks at how engineers and designers use historic inventions and clues from the natural world in ingenious ways to develop new buildings and machines.

And if you still can take some more, there is some really stunning footage in the “Invisible worlds” –  series (2010). Definitely something to go into my DVD collection, here’s a teaser:

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Play more …


The Federation of American Scientists (FAS) Learning Technologies Program (pre-)launched the Science Game Centerto demonstrate to teachers, scientists, museums, and parents the myriad ways games can be used to improve education in math and science“. Next to Phylo and Fold.it (which I mentioned around here before) are several entries listed I haven’t seen yet. It may be due to the movie “Fantastic Voyage” that made a lasting impression on me as a kid that “Immune attack” immediately caught my attention. After all, I’d rather kick some pathogenic butt than blowing up poor aliens in space. Good hunting!

P.S.: Reminds me of this quote by 137th Gebirg on battlestarforum.com

“I may appear unoccupied to you, but at the molecular level, I’m really quite busy.”

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3D Modelling of Proteins and DNA


Judging from the gallery and videos, the Graphite – LifeExplorer is a great tool to model protein and DNA :

The Graphite-LifeExplorer modeling tool to build 3D molecular assemblies of proteins and DNA from Protein Database (PDB) files. Atomic DNA can be modeled from scratch or reconstructed from simulation.

Unfortunately, I didn’t get the Mac-Version to work on my machine (Mac OS X 10.6.8) it works only for OS X 10.7.+ (got it running on 10.7.3) – it’s definitely worth keeping an eye on:

shared by Damien Larivière via LinkedIn/Molecular Modeling in Life Sciences.

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Biophilia

Biophilia is an extraordinary and innovative multimedia exploration of music, nature and technology by the musician Björk. Comprising a suite of original music and interactive, educational artworks and musical artifacts, Biophilia is released as ten in-app experiences that are accessed as you fly through a three-dimensional galaxy

I still haven’t downloaded and checked out the app myself in detail, the price-tag is a bit hefty for my taste. So far I have never spend over 10 bucks on a single app, and personally find it very hard to digest more than 2 Björk-songs in a row. OK, my ears aren’t bleeding, and in this case my eyes are very much tempted by the visuals. Biophilia contains several subsections (in-apps), so one could argue it’s more than just a single app, comparable to an entire (concept?-)album. On the app-store reviews there’s some criticism of the pricing-policy, however content-wise one reviewer goes as far as claiming that “we will eventually see Biophilia as the Sergeant Peppers of music apps“. A steep claim indeed to liken it to the fab four… but even though the music is not exactly my cup of tea, I am thrilled by the unique combination of contemporary art, science and technology.

As for the scientific content, the spring 2012 issue of the quarterly newsletter published by the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank (RCSB-PDB for short) features a snapshot of the video for Björk’s title “hollow”:

To accompany the song “Hollow,” Björk’s meditation on biological ancestry, [Biomedical animator Drew] Berry
created a lush landscape for DNA to replicate (and sparkle) to the music. Molecular
machines work at real-time speed, culminating in the appearance of Björk as a complex
protein structure. Many of the molecular shapes, illustrated with great depth and rich
color, were created with the help of crystal structure data from the PDB.

More of these stunning, educational and award-winning 3D animations by Drew Berry and his colleagues are available on WEHI.TV at the Walter+Elisabeth Hall Institute of Medical Research. Enjoy!

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Ars Electronica


(not to be confused with ars technica) … Next time I make it to Austria, I’ll have to visit this exhibition (in Linz), maybe even the festival. Awesome, definitely.

New cultural techniques are emerging in the ever more tightly-knit global networks of digital technologies.

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Visualizing your Social Network

LinkedIn offers a visualisation of your network connections. While browsing and looking at the persons represented by the nodes and their proximity, directly hypothesis form in the head as to the common context (when and where one met). To me the accuracy of the layout and coloring is amazing! That the different clusters actually delineate different institutes and departments I had the pleasure to work with/at is a nice “proof-of-concept”, albeit a bit terrifying as to how much the network knows about us … if you already are at LinkedIn give it a spin to see “the community” emerging around yourself. Makes you also wonder what the guys running the social networks actually can do with the entirety of network data we dump on them. Anyway, have fun exploring your local network!

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